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Starbucks Testing Mobile Trucks on College Campuses

Starbucks Testing Mobile Trucks on College Campuses


Starbucks is testing mobile “to-go” trucks on college campuses in Arizona, Virginia, and South Carolina

Lucky students from these three campuses will get to experience Starbucks on the go right before their early morning class.

Starbucks is dipping its toes into the mobile tuck business, and who better to test their new format on than groggy and overworked college students? Starbucks will be rolling out mobile truck versions of their stores (complete with an almost identical food and drink menu), and bringing them to college campuses at Arizona State University in Phoenix, James Madison University in Virginia, and Coastal Carolina University in South Carolina. The Starbucks food truck program is a pilot, and if it’s successful you’ll start to see these trucks pop up on college campuses across the country.

“Between classes, homework, extracurricular activities, jobs, and socializing with friends, today’s students truly embody the on-the-go lifestyle,” said Cathy Schlosberg, vice president of marketing for Aramark Education, which operates the Starbucks cafes on Arizona State University’s campus. “We believe the Starbucks mobile truck is a perfect opportunity to increase the convenience of our offerings and help meet our student body wherever they are in their busy days.“

Even though the menu will be the same, these portable Starbucks trucks will most likely open earlier and close later than other dining options on campuses to give students more options during off hours, and for when you really want that mocha latte at midnight right before a test. The trucks will be rolling onto campus before September 2.

For the latest happenings in the food and drink world, visit our Food News page.

Joanna Fantozzi is an Associate Editor with The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter@JoannaFantozzi


Starbucks will test mobile stores on college campuses

Starbucks is kicking the tires of the food truck business, with plans for mobile Starbucks stores to hit three U.S. college campuses this fall.

The trucks, run by longtime Starbucks partner and food services giant Aramark, will circulate around Arizona State University in the Phoenix area, the James Madison University campus in Virginia and Coastal Carolina University in South Carolina.

ASU is the university Starbucks partnered with to offer subsidized online college education for its staffers.

It’s not the first Starbucks “to go” store: That honour belongs to a Starbucks-branded train car hitched to a Swiss train that began slinging lattes to thirsty travelers last November. But it’s the first time the concept is applied in North America.

It’s a pilot, which means that if it succeeds, the trucks may pop up on other college campuses.

The trucks will offer a beverage and food menu that’s “nearly identical” to the one available in its other stores, Starbucks said.

High-end food trucks have become a common sight in recent years, populating street corners and urban parking lots from Los Angeles to Portland to Seattle and, this summer, in Toronto, at least in a limited way. For many young chefs, it’s a relatively low-cost entry to the foodie market.

Starbucks says the trucks can follow their customers’ schedules and in some cases can stay open later than other options.


Starbucks Test Mobile Trucks on College Campuses

Classes don’t begin until later this week at Arizona State University, but there’s already a buzz on campus about a Starbucks mobile truck.

The new truck, a pilot mobile service coming to three college campuses this fall, offers a menu of drinks and food nearly identical to what customers would find in their neighborhood Starbucks stores.

“People are surprised to see it, and then they’re excited,” says Ike Van Skike, district manager for Starbucks licensed stores. “ASU faculty and staff tell me this is great for them because it’s an area of the campus that doesn’t have a lot of food service.”

The Starbucks mobile truck can move to various locations on campus throughout the day, making it convenient for students and faculty to grab a snack or beverage. While hours will vary on each campus, trucks are able to adjust business hours to suit the needs of their customers, in some cases staying open later than a dining hall.

The mobile truck, which complements Starbucks cafes currently located across campus, is a licensed store operated through Aramark and is a natural extension of the long-standing partnership between the two companies.

“Between classes, homework, extracurricular activities, jobs, and socializing with friends, today’s students truly embody the on-the-go lifestyle,” says Cathy Schlosberg, vice president of marketing for Aramark Education. “We believe the Starbucks mobile truck is a perfect opportunity to increase the convenience of our offerings and help meet our student body wherever they are in their busy days.“

In addition to ASU, a truck will begin service on the James Madison University campus in Virginia on August 25 and Coastal Carolina University in South Carolina on September 18.


Starbucks will test mobile stores on college campuses

Starbucks is kicking the tires of the food truck business, with plans for mobile Starbucks stores to hit three college campuses this fall.

The trucks, run by longtime Starbucks partner and food services giant Aramark, will circulate around Arizona State University in the Phoenix area, the James Madison University campus in Virginia and Coastal Carolina University in South Carolina.

ASU is the university Starbucks partnered with to offer subsidized online college education for its staffers.

It's not the first Starbucks "to go" store: That honor belongs to a Starbucks-branded train car hitched to a Swiss train that began slinging lattes to thirsty travelers last November. But it's the first time the concept is applied in the U.S.

It's a pilot, which means that if it succeeds, the trucks may pop up on college campuses across the nation.

The trucks will offer a beverage and food menu that's "nearly identical" to the one available in its other stores, Starbucks said.

High-end food trucks have become a common sight in recent years, populating street corners and urban parking lots from Los Angeles to Portland to Seattle. For many young chefs, it's a relatively low-cost entry to the foodie market.


Starbucks to trawl for college students with food trucks

The old joke about Starbucks is that there are so many of the coffee shops across America that in some places you can sit in one location sipping a pumpkin spice latte and actually be able see another one of its stores across the street. If you think the brand is everywhere now, it's going to be truly ubiquitous at three universities this fall with a pilot program that has food trucks serving coffee to caffeine-starved students and faculty.

According to BusinessWeek, Starbucks has about 11,500 stores nationwide, but the company wants to increase its presence on college campuses. Therefore, it's launching this pilot program to see how things work by using trucks. They're already following herds of students at Arizona State University and James Madison University in Virginia, and Coastal Carolina University in South Carolina gets its coffee-delivery vehicle on September 18.

The true genius behind this plan is that the trucks aren't just going to sit in one place all day. Instead, they are moving around throughout the day to give students their first fix in the morning and be right there in the afternoon to top off their cups. Starbucks is even promising to adjust the trucks' hours as needed on each campus to suit customers, even staying open later than the dining halls in some cases. The company clearly knows once you get people hooked they are going to keep coming back for more. Scroll down to read Starbucks' announcement of the pilot program.

Starbucks Tests Mobile Trucks on Three College Campuses this Fall

Classes don't begin until later this week at Arizona State University, but there's already a buzz on campus about a Starbucks mobile truck.

The new truck, a pilot mobile service coming to three college campuses this fall, offers a menu of drinks and food nearly identical to what customers would find in their neighborhood Starbucks stores.

"People are surprised to see it, and then they're excited," said Ike Van Skike, district manager for Starbucks licensed stores. "ASU faculty and staff tell me this is great for them because it's an area of the campus that doesn't have a lot of food service."

The Starbucks mobile truck can move to various locations on campus throughout the day, making it convenient for students and faculty to grab a snack or beverage. While hours will vary on each campus, trucks are able to adjust business hours to suit the needs of their customers, in some cases staying open later than a dining hall.

The mobile truck, which complements Starbucks cafes currently located across campus, is a licensed store operated through Aramark and is a natural extension of the long-standing partnership between the two companies.

"Between classes, homework, extracurricular activities, jobs, and socializing with friends, today's students truly embody the on-the-go lifestyle," said Cathy Schlosberg, Vice President of Marketing for Aramark Education. "We believe the Starbucks mobile truck is a perfect opportunity to increase the convenience of our offerings and help meet our student body wherever they are in their busy days."

In addition to ASU, a truck will begin service on the James Madison University campus in Virginia on August 25 and Coastal Carolina University in South Carolina on September 18.

Starbucks looks forward to delivering world class service and the Starbucks Experience customers around the world have come to know – even on four wheels.


Starbucks will test mobile stores on college campuses

Starbucks is kicking the tires of the food truck business, with plans for mobile Starbucks stores to hit three college campuses this fall.

The trucks, run by longtime Starbucks partner and food services giant Aramark, will circulate around Arizona State University in the Phoenix area, the James Madison University campus in Virginia and Coastal Carolina University in South Carolina.

ASU is the university Starbucks partnered with to offer subsidized online college education for its staffers.

It's not the first Starbucks "to go" store: That honor belongs to a Starbucks-branded train car hitched to a Swiss train that began slinging lattes to thirsty travelers last November. But it's the first time the concept is applied in the U.S.

It's a pilot, which means that if it succeeds, the trucks may pop up on college campuses across the nation.

The trucks will offer a beverage and food menu that's "nearly identical" to the one available in its other stores, Starbucks said.

High-end food trucks have become a common sight in recent years, populating street corners and urban parking lots from Los Angeles to Portland to Seattle. For many young chefs, it's a relatively low-cost entry to the foodie market.


3 mashup ideas for Starbucks-inspired coffee trucks

A familiar face is coming to the roads of Rutgers University this fall: the Starbucks mermaid. The New Brunswick, N.J.-based school is testing a Starbucks truck throughout the upcoming semester, NJ.com reports. The company began testing trucks on college campuses in 2014, and now has mobile locations at Arizona State University, James Madison University in Virginia, East Carolina University in North Carolina and Sacramento State in California.

The trucks will serve the full lineup of Starbucks beverages that’s available at the outlet’s brick-and-mortar location at Rutgers, officials told the website, and university spokesman E.J. Miranda said the $200,000 spent on the truck, which includes branding rights, came from the Dining Services budget.

It may be the perfect time to capitalize on this growing thirst for coffee 25% of total respondents to FoodService Director’s 2016 Menu Trends survey predicted specialty coffee sales will grow in the next two years, with 46% of college operators expecting this boost. Meanwhile, Technomic's 2016 Beverage Trends Survey finds 65% and 59% of respondents have ordered hot and cold coffee, respectively, from foodservice locations in the past month.

FoodService Director mashed up some successful coffee ideas and food trucks to inspire operators contemplating the rollout of a self-branded caffeine machine.

1. Cold-brew coffee + ice cream

When it comes to coffee, cold brew is the new hotness. Technomic’s 2016 Beverage Trend Report names it one of the most popular trending beverages 27% of diners ages 18 to 34 find cold brew coffee appealing, and 19% of restaurants would like to offer more cold-brew options. So it seems only natural to pair the refreshing drink with a cold dessert. At the University of Connecticut, the UConn Dairy Bar Ice Cream Truck serves as an extension of a campus dairy bar. The truck has proven popular at catering events, says Dennis Pierce, executive director of dining services, and it also can be found on Twitter by following @ucdairybartruck. Coffee and ice cream also make the perfect mashup treat: Italian affogato.

2. Coffee roastery + clean labels

Organic, non-GMO, hormone-free, additive-free and other “healthy” buzzwords are on the tip of both operators’ and diners’ tongues in 2016. Winsight sister company Technomic reports that 40% of consumers are more concerned about what’s in their food and where it’s from than they were two years ago, and 82% of operators agree that clean labels will have a great or moderate influence on future purchasing.

Translating this transparency to coffee means showing diners every step of the process. Connecting Grounds coffee shop at Ohio State University serves 100% direct-trade coffee, and Senior Director of Dining Services Zia Ahmed tells FSD he personally visited the coffee farmers in Guatemala, Honduras and Mexico. At Yale University’s KBT Cafe, a kiosk in the lobby of the science building, coffee is roasted and ground in full view using equipment that fits on the countertop. An on-truck coffee roaster might be a tall order, but grinding coffee on-site and serving it with clean-label sandwiches and pastries certainly fits the bill.

3. Made-to-order drinks and international bowls

The mashup of DIY and Asian flavors may have been the biggest thing to hit foodservice in 2016. FSD’s Chefs’ Council Menu Trends survey found 58% of chefs saw bowls expanding in 2016, while flavors like Sriracha, gochujang, chipotle, wasabi and galangal root were driving these dishes. At Minneapolis Public Schools, Director of Culinary and Nutrition Services Bertrand Weber found success in pairing up with local restaurants to create international bowls like chicken curry and Caribbean-style with vegetables and brown rice for the district’s MPS Food Truck.

That desire for DIY extends into beverages. At the University of California at Berkeley, a revamped version of longtime cafe Ramona’s will include made-to-order coffee drinks, says San Francisco restaurateur Charles Phan, a Berkeley alumn and the brains behind the project. “Most of us in the Bay Area are, if not complete coffee snobs, at least somewhat coffee snobs,” says Jennifer Wolch, dean of the College of Environmental Design, which is based in the same building as Ramona’s.

A truck filled with hot trends may draw huge crowds, so separating this truck into two lines—one for ordering custom bowls, the other, coffee drinks—could prove a winning wait-time strategy.


Starbucks Will Test Mobile Stores on College Campuses

Starbucks is kicking the tires of the food truck business, with plans for mobile Starbucks stores to hit three college campuses this fall.

The trucks, run by longtime Starbucks partner and food services giant Aramark, will circulate around Arizona State University in the Phoenix area, the James Madison University campus in Virginia and Coastal Carolina University in South Carolina.

ASU is the university Starbucks partnered with to offer subsidized online college education for its staffers.

It?s not the first Starbucks ?to go? store: That honor belongs to a Starbucks-branded train car hitched to a Swiss train that began slinging lattes to thirsty travelers last November. But it?s the first time the concept is applied in the U.S.

It?s a pilot, which means that if it succeeds, the trucks may pop up on college campuses across the nation.

The trucks will offer a beverage and food menu that?s ?nearly identical? to the one available in its other stores, Starbucks said.

High-end food trucks have become a common sight in recent years, populating street corners and urban parking lots from Los Angeles to Portland to Seattle. For many young chefs, it?s a relatively low-cost entry to the foodie market.

Starbucks says the trucks can follow their customers? schedules and in some cases can stay open later than other options.


Make Way for the Starbucks Truck!

Food trucks are undoubtedly one of the greatest creations in the history of the universe. So, for that matter, is coffee. When you combine the two, you get something that’s out-of-this-world amazing — and thanks to Starbucks, the lucky students at three universities across the U.S. are going to get to experience it in all its glory. That’s right: Starbucks coffee trucks are coming, and if all goes well, they might just end up a fixture at college campuses everywhere.

According to Business Week, Starbucks is rolling out their mobile coffee units in conjunction with food service company Aramark. It’s a pilot program for now, which is why it’s only available at three schools presently but hey, if you go to James Madison University in Virginia, Costal Carolina University in South Carolina, or Arizona State University, you’re in luck — that’s where they’ll be. The Seattle Times noted that the trucks will have a food and drink menu that’s “nearly identical” to the ones available in its brick and mortar stores, too.

Why test out a ‘Bux truck on college campuses? According to NPR, the caffeine source of choice for those in the 18-to-24 age bracket is coffee since college campuses are full of 18-to-24-year-olds, most of whom are always desperately in need of a little pick-me-up, the decision makes perfect sense. Additionally, Business Week reports that coffee represents about 18 percent of Aramark’s sales on college campuses, which is double that of the fast food industry overall. I believe the phrase “match made in heaven” applies.

Interestingly, though, this isn’t the first time Starbucks has given the coffee truck idea a shot. According to Starbucks Melody, the chain set up one way back in 2010 at the location of a planned-but-still-under-construction store at Olive Way in its home city of Seattle. The comments section of that particular article also details a number of other Starbucks truck sightings, from Miami all the way to Germany. They seem to be quite popular, even if they've hitherto only made their appearances to promote specific beverages (a 2008 one seems to have been in support of the then-new Vivanno drinks).

Apparently colleges are terrific laboratories in which to test new and exciting methods of coffee distribution, so who knows what else we might see soon. Hand-delivered Starbucks? Starbucks dropped in little parachutes? A “Slap for Starbucks” app? Only time will tell!


Food Trucks and College Campuses are the Perfect Match

With more than 4,000 food trucks across the United States, the industry has become a juggernaut. With young people driving this growth across the country, it’s clear that hungry college students prefer food that is fast, affordable, and easy to carry.

College campuses that want to satisfy current students and attract new learners should embrace this trend. Not only does this move satisfy students, but budget hawks and innovation leaders at the university will also find reasons to smile.

Meet Students Where They Are

Today’s college students are more worried about being perfect than previous generations, according to a recent study. As such, college students are busier than ever, which means they need convenience in their meals. Food trucks on campus can give such students the flexibility and portability they want. In turn, the students can help grow the dining department’s brand.

With food trucks, colleges can also offer the new types of foods that today’s students want. It’s a less expensive way to incorporate gluten-free, vegetarian, paleo, and vegan dining options that some students want or need.

Keep the Money on Campus

Students have limited funds to spend on eating and there is plenty of competition for every dollar. By expanding the dining hall brand into mobile food trucks and offering more options for all students, dining departments get to give students what they really want and keep the money on campus.

Of course, today’s universities don’t have money to spend on frivolous items and inefficient programs. University Business reports that opening food trucks on campus keeps more of the money that students have to spend on campus. Universities who have gone this route found that they can fund more student activities.

Build and Award-Winning Brand

Like with any restaurant, a campus’s dining department is a brand. Like in any industry, those brands that innovate and adapt will win awards and others will fall behind. Virginia Tech, who has long been an industry leader in on-campus dining, invested in trucks from On The Move. After On The Move wrapped the trucks, the university won advertising awards and the industry took notice.

You can make your trucks look just as good and build a brand that turns heads. On The Move can help you with our full-service custom graphics and design, produce, and install the perfect truck wrap that draws students in and keeps them coming. Learn more about our graphics packages.


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