New recipes

America’s 12 Wildest Wings (Slideshow)

America’s 12 Wildest Wings (Slideshow)


Who said that wings needed to be served Buffalo-style?

12) Dick’s, Jacksonville, Fla.: Margarita Ranch

If you happen to find yourself in Jacksonville with a hankering for wings, get yourself over to Dick’s, stat. The mini-chain offers 30 varieties of wings, including Flying Fajita, Jamaican Jerk, Parmesan Peppercorn, and Ragin Cajun, but the wildest one of all just might be the Margarita Ranch, which tosses the wings with a homemade jalapeno lime hot sauce, ranch dressing, Cajun seasoning, and lime pepper. They’re tangy, spicy, sweet, and—hey, what do you know?—will leave you in the mood for a margarita.

11) Mott Street, Chicago: Everything Wings

Yelp/ Michael U

This hopping new restaurant from a former chef at Chicago’s acclaimed Ruxbin is kicking wings out of the park with its Asian night market-inspired menu. Their ‘Everything Wings’ are double-fried beauties, glazed with soy and dried chilis before being tossed with sesame and poppy seeds and fried shallots. It hits notes that those who like everything bagels will be familiar with, while kicking it up several notches of deliciousness.

10) Hill Country Barbecue, New York, N.Y.: Smoked Wings

Offered only as a special on Wednesday nights, these wings are worth seeking out, for one reason: smoke. Just like a perfectly fried wing, a perfectly smoked wing can leave you groaning with joy. The wings are rubbed with Hill Country’s signature spice blend, then smoked low and slow until the meat is falling off the bone. Take our word for it: these are wings you’re not likely to soon forget.

9) Chick-a-Biddy, Atlanta, Ga.: Thai Chili and Peanuts

There’s something about taking traditional Thai flavors and infusing them into chicken wings that just works, and at the always-creative Chick-a-Biddy in Atlanta, they’ve got it down pat. Their Thai chili and peanuts wings are sweet, spicy and salty, and hit all the right notes. You can also spring for two other super-creative and delicious options, spicy green Tabasco and wood-grilled Piri-Piri. Either way, you’ll be impressed.

8) St. Louis Wing Company, St. Louis, Mo.: Coconut Curry

Coconut curry is usually served in a big, comforting bowl, but at the St. Louis Wing Company chef Bobby Tessler has taken the popular comfort food and introduced it to the noble wing. He starts with coconut milk and adds a secret blend of Middle Eastern and Asian spices, and the resulting wing is sweet, spicy, and spot-on. They may make you want a bowl of actual curry, but they’ll most likely just make you want to order another dozen.

7) Eagles’ Nest Rockin’ Country Bar, Chesapeake, VA: Peanut Butter and Jelly

Fans of wild wings were saddened when the Crazy Wing Cantina in Chesapeake closed down recently, but thankfully their famous wings, in all their crazy styles, just moved to a nearby bar called Eagles’ Nest. The wildest offering of all? Peanut butter and jelly wings, which are just what they sound like: peanut butter and grape jelly are mixed together, crispy deep-fried wings are tossed in, and that’s it. Amazingly, the combination works: the creamy peanut butter melts and combines with the sweet jelly, and it’s a sticky, crispy treat that will have you considering adding chicken fingers to your next peanut butter and jelly sandwich.

6) SmokeEaters, San Jose, Calif.: Hellfire Wingers

We could do a whole slideshow on just super-spicy wings, but the ones at SmokeEaters really stand out from the pack. These wings are marinated in hot sauce, fried, then topped with about every spicy substance known to man, including a concentrate known as ‘Devil’s Blood.’ They’re so outrageously spicy that even a quick sniff will set you on a coughing fit. You’d be hard-pressed to get through just one (try to avoid getting the sauce all over your face), but if you can plow through a dozen you get your photo on the wall. You need to have a seriously high heat tolerance to get through these; even Man v. Food’s Adam Richman barely choked them down!

5) Talde, Brooklyn, N.Y.: Kung Pao Chicken Wings

At his eponymous Brooklyn restaurant, chef Dale Talde is crafting some outrageously delicious mashups of classic Americana with his ancestral Asian cuisine. One of the menu’s standouts are his now-famous kung pao chicken wings, which he prepares by tossing the wings in a rice flour batter, deep-frying them, tossing them in a sweet-and-spicy Kung Pao-inspired sauce, topping them with diced peanuts, cilantro, and scallions, and serving them alongside a buttermilk ranch sauce.

4) Distilled, New York, N.Y.: Distilled Wings

At this TriBeCa hotspot, Nick Iovacchini and Momofuku alum Shane Lyons are frying up some of the best, wildest wings you’ll find in New York. They’re dredged in a mixture of beer and various types of alcohol and starches, fried, frozen, fried again, then lacquered in a thick, sweet and savory sauce inspired by Gochujang, a Korean red chili sauce. You won’t even need the blue cheese sauce on the side, which is made with Point Reyes blue and also happens to be outrageously delicious.

3) Calypso Wings, Atlanta, Ga.: Pa’Zing

A Pa’Zing might sound like Pizza Hut’s newest limited-time-offering, but we doubt the chain would ever venture into this territory: Atlanta caterer Calypso Wings rolled these out last summer, and they instantly won the internet: wings are breaded and fried, then topped with marinara sauce, melted mozzarella, pepperoni, and sliced cherry tomatoes. Why didn’t we think of this before?

2) NOLA, New Orleans, La.: Miss Hay’s Stuffed Chicken Wings

A Vietnamese cook prepared these wings for Emeril Lagasse in 2000, and he enjoyed them so much that he added them to the menu at his restaurant NOLA and hasn’t taken them off since. First, they’re stuffed with ground pork, chopped shrimp, cilantro, celery, mushrooms, onions, and fish sauce. Then they’re baked, fried in peanut oil, and served with homemade hoisin sauce and jalapeños.

1) Pok Pok, Brooklyn, N.Y. and Portland, Ore.: Ike’s Vietnamese Fish Sauce Wings

These things are so good that Pok Pok chef/ owner Andy Ricker opened a (now closed) restaurant in New York that served only them. Today they’re available at the Pok Pok locations in Brooklyn and Portland as well as Ricker’s Brooklyn bar Whiskey Soda Lounge, and are one of the most popular items on the menu. These wings, addictive and inspired by ones eaten at a roadside shack in Vietnam, started it all, and helped raise Ricker and his restaurant to national prominence. To make them, Ricker marinates wings in a fish sauce-garlic mixture, twice-fries them, then tops them with more garlic and fish sauce. They hit all the right sweet, spicy, salty, and tangy notes, and before you know it you’ll have ordered a second round.


Easy Brine & Fried Chicken Wings

I’m not the type of person to deem any cooking project too big to try at home– just ask Brooke. But if you ask any of my good friends from college, they’ll happily tell you about Super Bowl 39, hosted in my apartment in Birmingham. Long story short- I made chicken wings. There was a fire. And we’re talking real flames shooting out of the bottom of an electric oven. There may have been some quantity of bourbon involved in that evening as well.

Fast forward 15 years. My love for football, and for chicken wings, is as strong as ever. (The only person I know that loves chicken wings more than I do, is Brooke. Needless to say Brooke’s not big on oven fires…) But these days, Super Bowl Sunday means a quiet evening at home while August sleeps in the next room and we share a bottle of wine or I whip up bourbon cocktails. For that, take-out wings just won’t do. So over the past weeks I set out to devise a recipe for chicken wings that is not only fire-proof, but also simple enough that I could confidently hand the recipe off to my sister-in-law and know that she’ll be turning out wings as good as any sports bar in town. Sloane, see what you think…

Brine-g it On
Our wings start out with an overnight brine. By soaking the wings in a mixture of water, salt, sugar and hot sauce the pick up tons of flavor and stay super-juicy throughout the cooking process. Brining chicken is nothing new, but the real genius comes when the wings are cooked in the brine before frying. Simply soak the chicken wings for 24-48 hours then bring them to a boil on the stovetop. Best of all the wings and be cooked up to two days before frying- one less thing to worry about come party time.

No Fear in Frying
The hardest part of the chicken wing is getting it fried correctly- if your oil is too hot the wings will burn before they’re cooked through (there’s no greater party pooper than medium-rare chicken!) if the oil is not hot enough they’ll come out greasy and pale. And even if you get your oil temperature just right, what the heck are you going to do with all of that oil when you’re done cooking?

Since our wings are brined and fully cooked before frying, you’ll only use a small amount of hot oil to quickly crisp the wings. No stressing over cook times to insure proper doneness or trying to devise a way to keep them hot and crisp while you cook batch after batch for 12 minutes a piece. See? We’ll get your chicken wings on the table so fast you won’t even miss your favorite commercial.

Some Like it Hot
Once your chicken wings are golden brown and crispy (less than 5 minutes) they take a quick bath in a traditional buttery hot sauce. You can make you sauce as spicy as you like. Our recipe would pass for medium on most menus, but mix it up and give a taste for yourself. If you want wings with more kick, just keep adding hot sauce until your taste buds catch fire.

Jamie’s Ultimate Chicken Wings

Brine
4 cups water
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup kosher salt
1/4 cup Frank’s Red Hot or Tabasco Pepper Sauce

4 cloves garlic
4 branches fresh thyme or 1 teaspoon dry thyme
2 lbs chicken wings

Sauce
1/4 cup Frank’s Red Hot or Tabasco Pepper Sauce
2 ounces butter, cut in to smal pieces

Combine the water, sugar and salt in bowl and whisk until disolved. Add the hot sauce, garlic, thyme and chicken wings. Cover the bowl and place in the refrigerator overnight, up to 48 hours.

Transfer the chicken wings and brine to a medium sauce pot. If the wings are not completely covered, add water to the pot until they are. Place the pot on the stove over high heat and bring to a boil. When the pot reaches a boil, turn off the heat and allow the wings to cool in the liquid for 15 minutes. Remove the wings from the liquid and store in the refrigerator, covered, until ready to serve.

To serve, remove the chicken from the refrigerator and set aside at room temperature while you prepare the oil and sauce. Place a large saute pan on the stove and full with canola or vegetable oil to a depth of approximately 3/4 inch. Turn the heat to medium.

Pour the Tabasco Pepper Sauce into a small sauce pot and place over high heat. Add the butter and whisk until melted and fully incorporated. Transfer the mixture to a large mixing bowl or a second large saute pan and hold next to the stove.

Place the flour in a mixing bowl or baking pan and season well with salt and pepper. Roll the chicken wings in the flour to coat completely. To test the oil sprinkle a pinch of flour into the pan. If the oil sizzles immediately it is ready to fry. Remove the wings from the flour one-by-one and pat off any of the excess flour. Carefully place the chicken in the hot oil- the oil should only come half way up the side of the wing.

Let the wings cook until golden brown, 1-2 mintues, then turn with a pair of tongs and brown again on the second side. Transfer the browned wings to the bowl of hot sauce. Keep the pan of oil full of wings but try not to let the wings touch one another. Every time you remove one wing, replace it with another until the wings have been browned.

Toss all of the wings in the bowl coat with the sauce and serve immediately.

**Leave the oil to cool on top of the stove. When cooled, pour the oil into a bottle with a screw on lid and discard.


Easy Brine & Fried Chicken Wings

I’m not the type of person to deem any cooking project too big to try at home– just ask Brooke. But if you ask any of my good friends from college, they’ll happily tell you about Super Bowl 39, hosted in my apartment in Birmingham. Long story short- I made chicken wings. There was a fire. And we’re talking real flames shooting out of the bottom of an electric oven. There may have been some quantity of bourbon involved in that evening as well.

Fast forward 15 years. My love for football, and for chicken wings, is as strong as ever. (The only person I know that loves chicken wings more than I do, is Brooke. Needless to say Brooke’s not big on oven fires…) But these days, Super Bowl Sunday means a quiet evening at home while August sleeps in the next room and we share a bottle of wine or I whip up bourbon cocktails. For that, take-out wings just won’t do. So over the past weeks I set out to devise a recipe for chicken wings that is not only fire-proof, but also simple enough that I could confidently hand the recipe off to my sister-in-law and know that she’ll be turning out wings as good as any sports bar in town. Sloane, see what you think…

Brine-g it On
Our wings start out with an overnight brine. By soaking the wings in a mixture of water, salt, sugar and hot sauce the pick up tons of flavor and stay super-juicy throughout the cooking process. Brining chicken is nothing new, but the real genius comes when the wings are cooked in the brine before frying. Simply soak the chicken wings for 24-48 hours then bring them to a boil on the stovetop. Best of all the wings and be cooked up to two days before frying- one less thing to worry about come party time.

No Fear in Frying
The hardest part of the chicken wing is getting it fried correctly- if your oil is too hot the wings will burn before they’re cooked through (there’s no greater party pooper than medium-rare chicken!) if the oil is not hot enough they’ll come out greasy and pale. And even if you get your oil temperature just right, what the heck are you going to do with all of that oil when you’re done cooking?

Since our wings are brined and fully cooked before frying, you’ll only use a small amount of hot oil to quickly crisp the wings. No stressing over cook times to insure proper doneness or trying to devise a way to keep them hot and crisp while you cook batch after batch for 12 minutes a piece. See? We’ll get your chicken wings on the table so fast you won’t even miss your favorite commercial.

Some Like it Hot
Once your chicken wings are golden brown and crispy (less than 5 minutes) they take a quick bath in a traditional buttery hot sauce. You can make you sauce as spicy as you like. Our recipe would pass for medium on most menus, but mix it up and give a taste for yourself. If you want wings with more kick, just keep adding hot sauce until your taste buds catch fire.

Jamie’s Ultimate Chicken Wings

Brine
4 cups water
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup kosher salt
1/4 cup Frank’s Red Hot or Tabasco Pepper Sauce

4 cloves garlic
4 branches fresh thyme or 1 teaspoon dry thyme
2 lbs chicken wings

Sauce
1/4 cup Frank’s Red Hot or Tabasco Pepper Sauce
2 ounces butter, cut in to smal pieces

Combine the water, sugar and salt in bowl and whisk until disolved. Add the hot sauce, garlic, thyme and chicken wings. Cover the bowl and place in the refrigerator overnight, up to 48 hours.

Transfer the chicken wings and brine to a medium sauce pot. If the wings are not completely covered, add water to the pot until they are. Place the pot on the stove over high heat and bring to a boil. When the pot reaches a boil, turn off the heat and allow the wings to cool in the liquid for 15 minutes. Remove the wings from the liquid and store in the refrigerator, covered, until ready to serve.

To serve, remove the chicken from the refrigerator and set aside at room temperature while you prepare the oil and sauce. Place a large saute pan on the stove and full with canola or vegetable oil to a depth of approximately 3/4 inch. Turn the heat to medium.

Pour the Tabasco Pepper Sauce into a small sauce pot and place over high heat. Add the butter and whisk until melted and fully incorporated. Transfer the mixture to a large mixing bowl or a second large saute pan and hold next to the stove.

Place the flour in a mixing bowl or baking pan and season well with salt and pepper. Roll the chicken wings in the flour to coat completely. To test the oil sprinkle a pinch of flour into the pan. If the oil sizzles immediately it is ready to fry. Remove the wings from the flour one-by-one and pat off any of the excess flour. Carefully place the chicken in the hot oil- the oil should only come half way up the side of the wing.

Let the wings cook until golden brown, 1-2 mintues, then turn with a pair of tongs and brown again on the second side. Transfer the browned wings to the bowl of hot sauce. Keep the pan of oil full of wings but try not to let the wings touch one another. Every time you remove one wing, replace it with another until the wings have been browned.

Toss all of the wings in the bowl coat with the sauce and serve immediately.

**Leave the oil to cool on top of the stove. When cooled, pour the oil into a bottle with a screw on lid and discard.


Easy Brine & Fried Chicken Wings

I’m not the type of person to deem any cooking project too big to try at home– just ask Brooke. But if you ask any of my good friends from college, they’ll happily tell you about Super Bowl 39, hosted in my apartment in Birmingham. Long story short- I made chicken wings. There was a fire. And we’re talking real flames shooting out of the bottom of an electric oven. There may have been some quantity of bourbon involved in that evening as well.

Fast forward 15 years. My love for football, and for chicken wings, is as strong as ever. (The only person I know that loves chicken wings more than I do, is Brooke. Needless to say Brooke’s not big on oven fires…) But these days, Super Bowl Sunday means a quiet evening at home while August sleeps in the next room and we share a bottle of wine or I whip up bourbon cocktails. For that, take-out wings just won’t do. So over the past weeks I set out to devise a recipe for chicken wings that is not only fire-proof, but also simple enough that I could confidently hand the recipe off to my sister-in-law and know that she’ll be turning out wings as good as any sports bar in town. Sloane, see what you think…

Brine-g it On
Our wings start out with an overnight brine. By soaking the wings in a mixture of water, salt, sugar and hot sauce the pick up tons of flavor and stay super-juicy throughout the cooking process. Brining chicken is nothing new, but the real genius comes when the wings are cooked in the brine before frying. Simply soak the chicken wings for 24-48 hours then bring them to a boil on the stovetop. Best of all the wings and be cooked up to two days before frying- one less thing to worry about come party time.

No Fear in Frying
The hardest part of the chicken wing is getting it fried correctly- if your oil is too hot the wings will burn before they’re cooked through (there’s no greater party pooper than medium-rare chicken!) if the oil is not hot enough they’ll come out greasy and pale. And even if you get your oil temperature just right, what the heck are you going to do with all of that oil when you’re done cooking?

Since our wings are brined and fully cooked before frying, you’ll only use a small amount of hot oil to quickly crisp the wings. No stressing over cook times to insure proper doneness or trying to devise a way to keep them hot and crisp while you cook batch after batch for 12 minutes a piece. See? We’ll get your chicken wings on the table so fast you won’t even miss your favorite commercial.

Some Like it Hot
Once your chicken wings are golden brown and crispy (less than 5 minutes) they take a quick bath in a traditional buttery hot sauce. You can make you sauce as spicy as you like. Our recipe would pass for medium on most menus, but mix it up and give a taste for yourself. If you want wings with more kick, just keep adding hot sauce until your taste buds catch fire.

Jamie’s Ultimate Chicken Wings

Brine
4 cups water
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup kosher salt
1/4 cup Frank’s Red Hot or Tabasco Pepper Sauce

4 cloves garlic
4 branches fresh thyme or 1 teaspoon dry thyme
2 lbs chicken wings

Sauce
1/4 cup Frank’s Red Hot or Tabasco Pepper Sauce
2 ounces butter, cut in to smal pieces

Combine the water, sugar and salt in bowl and whisk until disolved. Add the hot sauce, garlic, thyme and chicken wings. Cover the bowl and place in the refrigerator overnight, up to 48 hours.

Transfer the chicken wings and brine to a medium sauce pot. If the wings are not completely covered, add water to the pot until they are. Place the pot on the stove over high heat and bring to a boil. When the pot reaches a boil, turn off the heat and allow the wings to cool in the liquid for 15 minutes. Remove the wings from the liquid and store in the refrigerator, covered, until ready to serve.

To serve, remove the chicken from the refrigerator and set aside at room temperature while you prepare the oil and sauce. Place a large saute pan on the stove and full with canola or vegetable oil to a depth of approximately 3/4 inch. Turn the heat to medium.

Pour the Tabasco Pepper Sauce into a small sauce pot and place over high heat. Add the butter and whisk until melted and fully incorporated. Transfer the mixture to a large mixing bowl or a second large saute pan and hold next to the stove.

Place the flour in a mixing bowl or baking pan and season well with salt and pepper. Roll the chicken wings in the flour to coat completely. To test the oil sprinkle a pinch of flour into the pan. If the oil sizzles immediately it is ready to fry. Remove the wings from the flour one-by-one and pat off any of the excess flour. Carefully place the chicken in the hot oil- the oil should only come half way up the side of the wing.

Let the wings cook until golden brown, 1-2 mintues, then turn with a pair of tongs and brown again on the second side. Transfer the browned wings to the bowl of hot sauce. Keep the pan of oil full of wings but try not to let the wings touch one another. Every time you remove one wing, replace it with another until the wings have been browned.

Toss all of the wings in the bowl coat with the sauce and serve immediately.

**Leave the oil to cool on top of the stove. When cooled, pour the oil into a bottle with a screw on lid and discard.


Easy Brine & Fried Chicken Wings

I’m not the type of person to deem any cooking project too big to try at home– just ask Brooke. But if you ask any of my good friends from college, they’ll happily tell you about Super Bowl 39, hosted in my apartment in Birmingham. Long story short- I made chicken wings. There was a fire. And we’re talking real flames shooting out of the bottom of an electric oven. There may have been some quantity of bourbon involved in that evening as well.

Fast forward 15 years. My love for football, and for chicken wings, is as strong as ever. (The only person I know that loves chicken wings more than I do, is Brooke. Needless to say Brooke’s not big on oven fires…) But these days, Super Bowl Sunday means a quiet evening at home while August sleeps in the next room and we share a bottle of wine or I whip up bourbon cocktails. For that, take-out wings just won’t do. So over the past weeks I set out to devise a recipe for chicken wings that is not only fire-proof, but also simple enough that I could confidently hand the recipe off to my sister-in-law and know that she’ll be turning out wings as good as any sports bar in town. Sloane, see what you think…

Brine-g it On
Our wings start out with an overnight brine. By soaking the wings in a mixture of water, salt, sugar and hot sauce the pick up tons of flavor and stay super-juicy throughout the cooking process. Brining chicken is nothing new, but the real genius comes when the wings are cooked in the brine before frying. Simply soak the chicken wings for 24-48 hours then bring them to a boil on the stovetop. Best of all the wings and be cooked up to two days before frying- one less thing to worry about come party time.

No Fear in Frying
The hardest part of the chicken wing is getting it fried correctly- if your oil is too hot the wings will burn before they’re cooked through (there’s no greater party pooper than medium-rare chicken!) if the oil is not hot enough they’ll come out greasy and pale. And even if you get your oil temperature just right, what the heck are you going to do with all of that oil when you’re done cooking?

Since our wings are brined and fully cooked before frying, you’ll only use a small amount of hot oil to quickly crisp the wings. No stressing over cook times to insure proper doneness or trying to devise a way to keep them hot and crisp while you cook batch after batch for 12 minutes a piece. See? We’ll get your chicken wings on the table so fast you won’t even miss your favorite commercial.

Some Like it Hot
Once your chicken wings are golden brown and crispy (less than 5 minutes) they take a quick bath in a traditional buttery hot sauce. You can make you sauce as spicy as you like. Our recipe would pass for medium on most menus, but mix it up and give a taste for yourself. If you want wings with more kick, just keep adding hot sauce until your taste buds catch fire.

Jamie’s Ultimate Chicken Wings

Brine
4 cups water
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup kosher salt
1/4 cup Frank’s Red Hot or Tabasco Pepper Sauce

4 cloves garlic
4 branches fresh thyme or 1 teaspoon dry thyme
2 lbs chicken wings

Sauce
1/4 cup Frank’s Red Hot or Tabasco Pepper Sauce
2 ounces butter, cut in to smal pieces

Combine the water, sugar and salt in bowl and whisk until disolved. Add the hot sauce, garlic, thyme and chicken wings. Cover the bowl and place in the refrigerator overnight, up to 48 hours.

Transfer the chicken wings and brine to a medium sauce pot. If the wings are not completely covered, add water to the pot until they are. Place the pot on the stove over high heat and bring to a boil. When the pot reaches a boil, turn off the heat and allow the wings to cool in the liquid for 15 minutes. Remove the wings from the liquid and store in the refrigerator, covered, until ready to serve.

To serve, remove the chicken from the refrigerator and set aside at room temperature while you prepare the oil and sauce. Place a large saute pan on the stove and full with canola or vegetable oil to a depth of approximately 3/4 inch. Turn the heat to medium.

Pour the Tabasco Pepper Sauce into a small sauce pot and place over high heat. Add the butter and whisk until melted and fully incorporated. Transfer the mixture to a large mixing bowl or a second large saute pan and hold next to the stove.

Place the flour in a mixing bowl or baking pan and season well with salt and pepper. Roll the chicken wings in the flour to coat completely. To test the oil sprinkle a pinch of flour into the pan. If the oil sizzles immediately it is ready to fry. Remove the wings from the flour one-by-one and pat off any of the excess flour. Carefully place the chicken in the hot oil- the oil should only come half way up the side of the wing.

Let the wings cook until golden brown, 1-2 mintues, then turn with a pair of tongs and brown again on the second side. Transfer the browned wings to the bowl of hot sauce. Keep the pan of oil full of wings but try not to let the wings touch one another. Every time you remove one wing, replace it with another until the wings have been browned.

Toss all of the wings in the bowl coat with the sauce and serve immediately.

**Leave the oil to cool on top of the stove. When cooled, pour the oil into a bottle with a screw on lid and discard.


Easy Brine & Fried Chicken Wings

I’m not the type of person to deem any cooking project too big to try at home– just ask Brooke. But if you ask any of my good friends from college, they’ll happily tell you about Super Bowl 39, hosted in my apartment in Birmingham. Long story short- I made chicken wings. There was a fire. And we’re talking real flames shooting out of the bottom of an electric oven. There may have been some quantity of bourbon involved in that evening as well.

Fast forward 15 years. My love for football, and for chicken wings, is as strong as ever. (The only person I know that loves chicken wings more than I do, is Brooke. Needless to say Brooke’s not big on oven fires…) But these days, Super Bowl Sunday means a quiet evening at home while August sleeps in the next room and we share a bottle of wine or I whip up bourbon cocktails. For that, take-out wings just won’t do. So over the past weeks I set out to devise a recipe for chicken wings that is not only fire-proof, but also simple enough that I could confidently hand the recipe off to my sister-in-law and know that she’ll be turning out wings as good as any sports bar in town. Sloane, see what you think…

Brine-g it On
Our wings start out with an overnight brine. By soaking the wings in a mixture of water, salt, sugar and hot sauce the pick up tons of flavor and stay super-juicy throughout the cooking process. Brining chicken is nothing new, but the real genius comes when the wings are cooked in the brine before frying. Simply soak the chicken wings for 24-48 hours then bring them to a boil on the stovetop. Best of all the wings and be cooked up to two days before frying- one less thing to worry about come party time.

No Fear in Frying
The hardest part of the chicken wing is getting it fried correctly- if your oil is too hot the wings will burn before they’re cooked through (there’s no greater party pooper than medium-rare chicken!) if the oil is not hot enough they’ll come out greasy and pale. And even if you get your oil temperature just right, what the heck are you going to do with all of that oil when you’re done cooking?

Since our wings are brined and fully cooked before frying, you’ll only use a small amount of hot oil to quickly crisp the wings. No stressing over cook times to insure proper doneness or trying to devise a way to keep them hot and crisp while you cook batch after batch for 12 minutes a piece. See? We’ll get your chicken wings on the table so fast you won’t even miss your favorite commercial.

Some Like it Hot
Once your chicken wings are golden brown and crispy (less than 5 minutes) they take a quick bath in a traditional buttery hot sauce. You can make you sauce as spicy as you like. Our recipe would pass for medium on most menus, but mix it up and give a taste for yourself. If you want wings with more kick, just keep adding hot sauce until your taste buds catch fire.

Jamie’s Ultimate Chicken Wings

Brine
4 cups water
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup kosher salt
1/4 cup Frank’s Red Hot or Tabasco Pepper Sauce

4 cloves garlic
4 branches fresh thyme or 1 teaspoon dry thyme
2 lbs chicken wings

Sauce
1/4 cup Frank’s Red Hot or Tabasco Pepper Sauce
2 ounces butter, cut in to smal pieces

Combine the water, sugar and salt in bowl and whisk until disolved. Add the hot sauce, garlic, thyme and chicken wings. Cover the bowl and place in the refrigerator overnight, up to 48 hours.

Transfer the chicken wings and brine to a medium sauce pot. If the wings are not completely covered, add water to the pot until they are. Place the pot on the stove over high heat and bring to a boil. When the pot reaches a boil, turn off the heat and allow the wings to cool in the liquid for 15 minutes. Remove the wings from the liquid and store in the refrigerator, covered, until ready to serve.

To serve, remove the chicken from the refrigerator and set aside at room temperature while you prepare the oil and sauce. Place a large saute pan on the stove and full with canola or vegetable oil to a depth of approximately 3/4 inch. Turn the heat to medium.

Pour the Tabasco Pepper Sauce into a small sauce pot and place over high heat. Add the butter and whisk until melted and fully incorporated. Transfer the mixture to a large mixing bowl or a second large saute pan and hold next to the stove.

Place the flour in a mixing bowl or baking pan and season well with salt and pepper. Roll the chicken wings in the flour to coat completely. To test the oil sprinkle a pinch of flour into the pan. If the oil sizzles immediately it is ready to fry. Remove the wings from the flour one-by-one and pat off any of the excess flour. Carefully place the chicken in the hot oil- the oil should only come half way up the side of the wing.

Let the wings cook until golden brown, 1-2 mintues, then turn with a pair of tongs and brown again on the second side. Transfer the browned wings to the bowl of hot sauce. Keep the pan of oil full of wings but try not to let the wings touch one another. Every time you remove one wing, replace it with another until the wings have been browned.

Toss all of the wings in the bowl coat with the sauce and serve immediately.

**Leave the oil to cool on top of the stove. When cooled, pour the oil into a bottle with a screw on lid and discard.


Easy Brine & Fried Chicken Wings

I’m not the type of person to deem any cooking project too big to try at home– just ask Brooke. But if you ask any of my good friends from college, they’ll happily tell you about Super Bowl 39, hosted in my apartment in Birmingham. Long story short- I made chicken wings. There was a fire. And we’re talking real flames shooting out of the bottom of an electric oven. There may have been some quantity of bourbon involved in that evening as well.

Fast forward 15 years. My love for football, and for chicken wings, is as strong as ever. (The only person I know that loves chicken wings more than I do, is Brooke. Needless to say Brooke’s not big on oven fires…) But these days, Super Bowl Sunday means a quiet evening at home while August sleeps in the next room and we share a bottle of wine or I whip up bourbon cocktails. For that, take-out wings just won’t do. So over the past weeks I set out to devise a recipe for chicken wings that is not only fire-proof, but also simple enough that I could confidently hand the recipe off to my sister-in-law and know that she’ll be turning out wings as good as any sports bar in town. Sloane, see what you think…

Brine-g it On
Our wings start out with an overnight brine. By soaking the wings in a mixture of water, salt, sugar and hot sauce the pick up tons of flavor and stay super-juicy throughout the cooking process. Brining chicken is nothing new, but the real genius comes when the wings are cooked in the brine before frying. Simply soak the chicken wings for 24-48 hours then bring them to a boil on the stovetop. Best of all the wings and be cooked up to two days before frying- one less thing to worry about come party time.

No Fear in Frying
The hardest part of the chicken wing is getting it fried correctly- if your oil is too hot the wings will burn before they’re cooked through (there’s no greater party pooper than medium-rare chicken!) if the oil is not hot enough they’ll come out greasy and pale. And even if you get your oil temperature just right, what the heck are you going to do with all of that oil when you’re done cooking?

Since our wings are brined and fully cooked before frying, you’ll only use a small amount of hot oil to quickly crisp the wings. No stressing over cook times to insure proper doneness or trying to devise a way to keep them hot and crisp while you cook batch after batch for 12 minutes a piece. See? We’ll get your chicken wings on the table so fast you won’t even miss your favorite commercial.

Some Like it Hot
Once your chicken wings are golden brown and crispy (less than 5 minutes) they take a quick bath in a traditional buttery hot sauce. You can make you sauce as spicy as you like. Our recipe would pass for medium on most menus, but mix it up and give a taste for yourself. If you want wings with more kick, just keep adding hot sauce until your taste buds catch fire.

Jamie’s Ultimate Chicken Wings

Brine
4 cups water
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup kosher salt
1/4 cup Frank’s Red Hot or Tabasco Pepper Sauce

4 cloves garlic
4 branches fresh thyme or 1 teaspoon dry thyme
2 lbs chicken wings

Sauce
1/4 cup Frank’s Red Hot or Tabasco Pepper Sauce
2 ounces butter, cut in to smal pieces

Combine the water, sugar and salt in bowl and whisk until disolved. Add the hot sauce, garlic, thyme and chicken wings. Cover the bowl and place in the refrigerator overnight, up to 48 hours.

Transfer the chicken wings and brine to a medium sauce pot. If the wings are not completely covered, add water to the pot until they are. Place the pot on the stove over high heat and bring to a boil. When the pot reaches a boil, turn off the heat and allow the wings to cool in the liquid for 15 minutes. Remove the wings from the liquid and store in the refrigerator, covered, until ready to serve.

To serve, remove the chicken from the refrigerator and set aside at room temperature while you prepare the oil and sauce. Place a large saute pan on the stove and full with canola or vegetable oil to a depth of approximately 3/4 inch. Turn the heat to medium.

Pour the Tabasco Pepper Sauce into a small sauce pot and place over high heat. Add the butter and whisk until melted and fully incorporated. Transfer the mixture to a large mixing bowl or a second large saute pan and hold next to the stove.

Place the flour in a mixing bowl or baking pan and season well with salt and pepper. Roll the chicken wings in the flour to coat completely. To test the oil sprinkle a pinch of flour into the pan. If the oil sizzles immediately it is ready to fry. Remove the wings from the flour one-by-one and pat off any of the excess flour. Carefully place the chicken in the hot oil- the oil should only come half way up the side of the wing.

Let the wings cook until golden brown, 1-2 mintues, then turn with a pair of tongs and brown again on the second side. Transfer the browned wings to the bowl of hot sauce. Keep the pan of oil full of wings but try not to let the wings touch one another. Every time you remove one wing, replace it with another until the wings have been browned.

Toss all of the wings in the bowl coat with the sauce and serve immediately.

**Leave the oil to cool on top of the stove. When cooled, pour the oil into a bottle with a screw on lid and discard.


Easy Brine & Fried Chicken Wings

I’m not the type of person to deem any cooking project too big to try at home– just ask Brooke. But if you ask any of my good friends from college, they’ll happily tell you about Super Bowl 39, hosted in my apartment in Birmingham. Long story short- I made chicken wings. There was a fire. And we’re talking real flames shooting out of the bottom of an electric oven. There may have been some quantity of bourbon involved in that evening as well.

Fast forward 15 years. My love for football, and for chicken wings, is as strong as ever. (The only person I know that loves chicken wings more than I do, is Brooke. Needless to say Brooke’s not big on oven fires…) But these days, Super Bowl Sunday means a quiet evening at home while August sleeps in the next room and we share a bottle of wine or I whip up bourbon cocktails. For that, take-out wings just won’t do. So over the past weeks I set out to devise a recipe for chicken wings that is not only fire-proof, but also simple enough that I could confidently hand the recipe off to my sister-in-law and know that she’ll be turning out wings as good as any sports bar in town. Sloane, see what you think…

Brine-g it On
Our wings start out with an overnight brine. By soaking the wings in a mixture of water, salt, sugar and hot sauce the pick up tons of flavor and stay super-juicy throughout the cooking process. Brining chicken is nothing new, but the real genius comes when the wings are cooked in the brine before frying. Simply soak the chicken wings for 24-48 hours then bring them to a boil on the stovetop. Best of all the wings and be cooked up to two days before frying- one less thing to worry about come party time.

No Fear in Frying
The hardest part of the chicken wing is getting it fried correctly- if your oil is too hot the wings will burn before they’re cooked through (there’s no greater party pooper than medium-rare chicken!) if the oil is not hot enough they’ll come out greasy and pale. And even if you get your oil temperature just right, what the heck are you going to do with all of that oil when you’re done cooking?

Since our wings are brined and fully cooked before frying, you’ll only use a small amount of hot oil to quickly crisp the wings. No stressing over cook times to insure proper doneness or trying to devise a way to keep them hot and crisp while you cook batch after batch for 12 minutes a piece. See? We’ll get your chicken wings on the table so fast you won’t even miss your favorite commercial.

Some Like it Hot
Once your chicken wings are golden brown and crispy (less than 5 minutes) they take a quick bath in a traditional buttery hot sauce. You can make you sauce as spicy as you like. Our recipe would pass for medium on most menus, but mix it up and give a taste for yourself. If you want wings with more kick, just keep adding hot sauce until your taste buds catch fire.

Jamie’s Ultimate Chicken Wings

Brine
4 cups water
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup kosher salt
1/4 cup Frank’s Red Hot or Tabasco Pepper Sauce

4 cloves garlic
4 branches fresh thyme or 1 teaspoon dry thyme
2 lbs chicken wings

Sauce
1/4 cup Frank’s Red Hot or Tabasco Pepper Sauce
2 ounces butter, cut in to smal pieces

Combine the water, sugar and salt in bowl and whisk until disolved. Add the hot sauce, garlic, thyme and chicken wings. Cover the bowl and place in the refrigerator overnight, up to 48 hours.

Transfer the chicken wings and brine to a medium sauce pot. If the wings are not completely covered, add water to the pot until they are. Place the pot on the stove over high heat and bring to a boil. When the pot reaches a boil, turn off the heat and allow the wings to cool in the liquid for 15 minutes. Remove the wings from the liquid and store in the refrigerator, covered, until ready to serve.

To serve, remove the chicken from the refrigerator and set aside at room temperature while you prepare the oil and sauce. Place a large saute pan on the stove and full with canola or vegetable oil to a depth of approximately 3/4 inch. Turn the heat to medium.

Pour the Tabasco Pepper Sauce into a small sauce pot and place over high heat. Add the butter and whisk until melted and fully incorporated. Transfer the mixture to a large mixing bowl or a second large saute pan and hold next to the stove.

Place the flour in a mixing bowl or baking pan and season well with salt and pepper. Roll the chicken wings in the flour to coat completely. To test the oil sprinkle a pinch of flour into the pan. If the oil sizzles immediately it is ready to fry. Remove the wings from the flour one-by-one and pat off any of the excess flour. Carefully place the chicken in the hot oil- the oil should only come half way up the side of the wing.

Let the wings cook until golden brown, 1-2 mintues, then turn with a pair of tongs and brown again on the second side. Transfer the browned wings to the bowl of hot sauce. Keep the pan of oil full of wings but try not to let the wings touch one another. Every time you remove one wing, replace it with another until the wings have been browned.

Toss all of the wings in the bowl coat with the sauce and serve immediately.

**Leave the oil to cool on top of the stove. When cooled, pour the oil into a bottle with a screw on lid and discard.


Easy Brine & Fried Chicken Wings

I’m not the type of person to deem any cooking project too big to try at home– just ask Brooke. But if you ask any of my good friends from college, they’ll happily tell you about Super Bowl 39, hosted in my apartment in Birmingham. Long story short- I made chicken wings. There was a fire. And we’re talking real flames shooting out of the bottom of an electric oven. There may have been some quantity of bourbon involved in that evening as well.

Fast forward 15 years. My love for football, and for chicken wings, is as strong as ever. (The only person I know that loves chicken wings more than I do, is Brooke. Needless to say Brooke’s not big on oven fires…) But these days, Super Bowl Sunday means a quiet evening at home while August sleeps in the next room and we share a bottle of wine or I whip up bourbon cocktails. For that, take-out wings just won’t do. So over the past weeks I set out to devise a recipe for chicken wings that is not only fire-proof, but also simple enough that I could confidently hand the recipe off to my sister-in-law and know that she’ll be turning out wings as good as any sports bar in town. Sloane, see what you think…

Brine-g it On
Our wings start out with an overnight brine. By soaking the wings in a mixture of water, salt, sugar and hot sauce the pick up tons of flavor and stay super-juicy throughout the cooking process. Brining chicken is nothing new, but the real genius comes when the wings are cooked in the brine before frying. Simply soak the chicken wings for 24-48 hours then bring them to a boil on the stovetop. Best of all the wings and be cooked up to two days before frying- one less thing to worry about come party time.

No Fear in Frying
The hardest part of the chicken wing is getting it fried correctly- if your oil is too hot the wings will burn before they’re cooked through (there’s no greater party pooper than medium-rare chicken!) if the oil is not hot enough they’ll come out greasy and pale. And even if you get your oil temperature just right, what the heck are you going to do with all of that oil when you’re done cooking?

Since our wings are brined and fully cooked before frying, you’ll only use a small amount of hot oil to quickly crisp the wings. No stressing over cook times to insure proper doneness or trying to devise a way to keep them hot and crisp while you cook batch after batch for 12 minutes a piece. See? We’ll get your chicken wings on the table so fast you won’t even miss your favorite commercial.

Some Like it Hot
Once your chicken wings are golden brown and crispy (less than 5 minutes) they take a quick bath in a traditional buttery hot sauce. You can make you sauce as spicy as you like. Our recipe would pass for medium on most menus, but mix it up and give a taste for yourself. If you want wings with more kick, just keep adding hot sauce until your taste buds catch fire.

Jamie’s Ultimate Chicken Wings

Brine
4 cups water
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup kosher salt
1/4 cup Frank’s Red Hot or Tabasco Pepper Sauce

4 cloves garlic
4 branches fresh thyme or 1 teaspoon dry thyme
2 lbs chicken wings

Sauce
1/4 cup Frank’s Red Hot or Tabasco Pepper Sauce
2 ounces butter, cut in to smal pieces

Combine the water, sugar and salt in bowl and whisk until disolved. Add the hot sauce, garlic, thyme and chicken wings. Cover the bowl and place in the refrigerator overnight, up to 48 hours.

Transfer the chicken wings and brine to a medium sauce pot. If the wings are not completely covered, add water to the pot until they are. Place the pot on the stove over high heat and bring to a boil. When the pot reaches a boil, turn off the heat and allow the wings to cool in the liquid for 15 minutes. Remove the wings from the liquid and store in the refrigerator, covered, until ready to serve.

To serve, remove the chicken from the refrigerator and set aside at room temperature while you prepare the oil and sauce. Place a large saute pan on the stove and full with canola or vegetable oil to a depth of approximately 3/4 inch. Turn the heat to medium.

Pour the Tabasco Pepper Sauce into a small sauce pot and place over high heat. Add the butter and whisk until melted and fully incorporated. Transfer the mixture to a large mixing bowl or a second large saute pan and hold next to the stove.

Place the flour in a mixing bowl or baking pan and season well with salt and pepper. Roll the chicken wings in the flour to coat completely. To test the oil sprinkle a pinch of flour into the pan. If the oil sizzles immediately it is ready to fry. Remove the wings from the flour one-by-one and pat off any of the excess flour. Carefully place the chicken in the hot oil- the oil should only come half way up the side of the wing.

Let the wings cook until golden brown, 1-2 mintues, then turn with a pair of tongs and brown again on the second side. Transfer the browned wings to the bowl of hot sauce. Keep the pan of oil full of wings but try not to let the wings touch one another. Every time you remove one wing, replace it with another until the wings have been browned.

Toss all of the wings in the bowl coat with the sauce and serve immediately.

**Leave the oil to cool on top of the stove. When cooled, pour the oil into a bottle with a screw on lid and discard.


Easy Brine & Fried Chicken Wings

I’m not the type of person to deem any cooking project too big to try at home– just ask Brooke. But if you ask any of my good friends from college, they’ll happily tell you about Super Bowl 39, hosted in my apartment in Birmingham. Long story short- I made chicken wings. There was a fire. And we’re talking real flames shooting out of the bottom of an electric oven. There may have been some quantity of bourbon involved in that evening as well.

Fast forward 15 years. My love for football, and for chicken wings, is as strong as ever. (The only person I know that loves chicken wings more than I do, is Brooke. Needless to say Brooke’s not big on oven fires…) But these days, Super Bowl Sunday means a quiet evening at home while August sleeps in the next room and we share a bottle of wine or I whip up bourbon cocktails. For that, take-out wings just won’t do. So over the past weeks I set out to devise a recipe for chicken wings that is not only fire-proof, but also simple enough that I could confidently hand the recipe off to my sister-in-law and know that she’ll be turning out wings as good as any sports bar in town. Sloane, see what you think…

Brine-g it On
Our wings start out with an overnight brine. By soaking the wings in a mixture of water, salt, sugar and hot sauce the pick up tons of flavor and stay super-juicy throughout the cooking process. Brining chicken is nothing new, but the real genius comes when the wings are cooked in the brine before frying. Simply soak the chicken wings for 24-48 hours then bring them to a boil on the stovetop. Best of all the wings and be cooked up to two days before frying- one less thing to worry about come party time.

No Fear in Frying
The hardest part of the chicken wing is getting it fried correctly- if your oil is too hot the wings will burn before they’re cooked through (there’s no greater party pooper than medium-rare chicken!) if the oil is not hot enough they’ll come out greasy and pale. And even if you get your oil temperature just right, what the heck are you going to do with all of that oil when you’re done cooking?

Since our wings are brined and fully cooked before frying, you’ll only use a small amount of hot oil to quickly crisp the wings. No stressing over cook times to insure proper doneness or trying to devise a way to keep them hot and crisp while you cook batch after batch for 12 minutes a piece. See? We’ll get your chicken wings on the table so fast you won’t even miss your favorite commercial.

Some Like it Hot
Once your chicken wings are golden brown and crispy (less than 5 minutes) they take a quick bath in a traditional buttery hot sauce. You can make you sauce as spicy as you like. Our recipe would pass for medium on most menus, but mix it up and give a taste for yourself. If you want wings with more kick, just keep adding hot sauce until your taste buds catch fire.

Jamie’s Ultimate Chicken Wings

Brine
4 cups water
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup kosher salt
1/4 cup Frank’s Red Hot or Tabasco Pepper Sauce

4 cloves garlic
4 branches fresh thyme or 1 teaspoon dry thyme
2 lbs chicken wings

Sauce
1/4 cup Frank’s Red Hot or Tabasco Pepper Sauce
2 ounces butter, cut in to smal pieces

Combine the water, sugar and salt in bowl and whisk until disolved. Add the hot sauce, garlic, thyme and chicken wings. Cover the bowl and place in the refrigerator overnight, up to 48 hours.

Transfer the chicken wings and brine to a medium sauce pot. If the wings are not completely covered, add water to the pot until they are. Place the pot on the stove over high heat and bring to a boil. When the pot reaches a boil, turn off the heat and allow the wings to cool in the liquid for 15 minutes. Remove the wings from the liquid and store in the refrigerator, covered, until ready to serve.

To serve, remove the chicken from the refrigerator and set aside at room temperature while you prepare the oil and sauce. Place a large saute pan on the stove and full with canola or vegetable oil to a depth of approximately 3/4 inch. Turn the heat to medium.

Pour the Tabasco Pepper Sauce into a small sauce pot and place over high heat. Add the butter and whisk until melted and fully incorporated. Transfer the mixture to a large mixing bowl or a second large saute pan and hold next to the stove.

Place the flour in a mixing bowl or baking pan and season well with salt and pepper. Roll the chicken wings in the flour to coat completely. To test the oil sprinkle a pinch of flour into the pan. If the oil sizzles immediately it is ready to fry. Remove the wings from the flour one-by-one and pat off any of the excess flour. Carefully place the chicken in the hot oil- the oil should only come half way up the side of the wing.

Let the wings cook until golden brown, 1-2 mintues, then turn with a pair of tongs and brown again on the second side. Transfer the browned wings to the bowl of hot sauce. Keep the pan of oil full of wings but try not to let the wings touch one another. Every time you remove one wing, replace it with another until the wings have been browned.

Toss all of the wings in the bowl coat with the sauce and serve immediately.

**Leave the oil to cool on top of the stove. When cooled, pour the oil into a bottle with a screw on lid and discard.


Easy Brine & Fried Chicken Wings

I’m not the type of person to deem any cooking project too big to try at home– just ask Brooke. But if you ask any of my good friends from college, they’ll happily tell you about Super Bowl 39, hosted in my apartment in Birmingham. Long story short- I made chicken wings. There was a fire. And we’re talking real flames shooting out of the bottom of an electric oven. There may have been some quantity of bourbon involved in that evening as well.

Fast forward 15 years. My love for football, and for chicken wings, is as strong as ever. (The only person I know that loves chicken wings more than I do, is Brooke. Needless to say Brooke’s not big on oven fires…) But these days, Super Bowl Sunday means a quiet evening at home while August sleeps in the next room and we share a bottle of wine or I whip up bourbon cocktails. For that, take-out wings just won’t do. So over the past weeks I set out to devise a recipe for chicken wings that is not only fire-proof, but also simple enough that I could confidently hand the recipe off to my sister-in-law and know that she’ll be turning out wings as good as any sports bar in town. Sloane, see what you think…

Brine-g it On
Our wings start out with an overnight brine. By soaking the wings in a mixture of water, salt, sugar and hot sauce the pick up tons of flavor and stay super-juicy throughout the cooking process. Brining chicken is nothing new, but the real genius comes when the wings are cooked in the brine before frying. Simply soak the chicken wings for 24-48 hours then bring them to a boil on the stovetop. Best of all the wings and be cooked up to two days before frying- one less thing to worry about come party time.

No Fear in Frying
The hardest part of the chicken wing is getting it fried correctly- if your oil is too hot the wings will burn before they’re cooked through (there’s no greater party pooper than medium-rare chicken!) if the oil is not hot enough they’ll come out greasy and pale. And even if you get your oil temperature just right, what the heck are you going to do with all of that oil when you’re done cooking?

Since our wings are brined and fully cooked before frying, you’ll only use a small amount of hot oil to quickly crisp the wings. No stressing over cook times to insure proper doneness or trying to devise a way to keep them hot and crisp while you cook batch after batch for 12 minutes a piece. See? We’ll get your chicken wings on the table so fast you won’t even miss your favorite commercial.

Some Like it Hot
Once your chicken wings are golden brown and crispy (less than 5 minutes) they take a quick bath in a traditional buttery hot sauce. You can make you sauce as spicy as you like. Our recipe would pass for medium on most menus, but mix it up and give a taste for yourself. If you want wings with more kick, just keep adding hot sauce until your taste buds catch fire.

Jamie’s Ultimate Chicken Wings

Brine
4 cups water
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup kosher salt
1/4 cup Frank’s Red Hot or Tabasco Pepper Sauce

4 cloves garlic
4 branches fresh thyme or 1 teaspoon dry thyme
2 lbs chicken wings

Sauce
1/4 cup Frank’s Red Hot or Tabasco Pepper Sauce
2 ounces butter, cut in to smal pieces

Combine the water, sugar and salt in bowl and whisk until disolved. Add the hot sauce, garlic, thyme and chicken wings. Cover the bowl and place in the refrigerator overnight, up to 48 hours.

Transfer the chicken wings and brine to a medium sauce pot. If the wings are not completely covered, add water to the pot until they are. Place the pot on the stove over high heat and bring to a boil. When the pot reaches a boil, turn off the heat and allow the wings to cool in the liquid for 15 minutes. Remove the wings from the liquid and store in the refrigerator, covered, until ready to serve.

To serve, remove the chicken from the refrigerator and set aside at room temperature while you prepare the oil and sauce. Place a large saute pan on the stove and full with canola or vegetable oil to a depth of approximately 3/4 inch. Turn the heat to medium.

Pour the Tabasco Pepper Sauce into a small sauce pot and place over high heat. Add the butter and whisk until melted and fully incorporated. Transfer the mixture to a large mixing bowl or a second large saute pan and hold next to the stove.

Place the flour in a mixing bowl or baking pan and season well with salt and pepper. Roll the chicken wings in the flour to coat completely. To test the oil sprinkle a pinch of flour into the pan. If the oil sizzles immediately it is ready to fry. Remove the wings from the flour one-by-one and pat off any of the excess flour. Carefully place the chicken in the hot oil- the oil should only come half way up the side of the wing.

Let the wings cook until golden brown, 1-2 mintues, then turn with a pair of tongs and brown again on the second side. Transfer the browned wings to the bowl of hot sauce. Keep the pan of oil full of wings but try not to let the wings touch one another. Every time you remove one wing, replace it with another until the wings have been browned.

Toss all of the wings in the bowl coat with the sauce and serve immediately.

**Leave the oil to cool on top of the stove. When cooled, pour the oil into a bottle with a screw on lid and discard.


Watch the video: Top 10 Most Insane Waterslides