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Drink Your Way Around Portugal

Drink Your Way Around Portugal


Spain, Italy, France. These are the places most people first think of when they imagine going on a wine-tasting trip in Europe. Portugal seems to get lost in the shuffle, a side trip on the Iberian Peninsula or a long strip of land between Spain and the sea. But that’s about to change. Not only is Portugal one of the most affordable wine-tasting destinations in Western Europe, but in addition to producing an incredibly diverse array of quality wines, the country also offers enough other specialty drinks to keep your liver working overtime for weeks.

The country has been getting big buzz lately; not only are Portugal’s wines top-notch, but the food is better than ever, with talented new chefs putting modern twists on traditional cuisine. Travel in Portugal is cheap, easy, and — for the moment at least — relatively uncrowded. Here are a few potent potables not to miss in Portugal.

Port:

Port, a fortified wine, is Portugal’s most famous and distinctive export. In the early 1700s, during England’s war with France, the citizens of England were deprived of French wine and looked to Portugal for a replacement. But the wine spoiled on the long trip, so they devised a method of fortifying it to increase its longevity. A neutral grape spirit, called aguardente, is added to the wine-making process to stop fermentation, keeping more of the natural sugar intact. The wines are then aged in barrels or bottles depending on the style — white port, ruby port, tawny port, late bottled vintage, colheita, blends, and vintage port.

In the 1700s and 1800s, the grapes for the port were grown in the Douro Valley and then shipped to Porto, where they were turned into port wine and aged in cellars (called caves) in the city so they could easily be shipped down the river to the Atlantic and then on to England. Nowadays, the grapes are still grown in the Douro Valley (in fact, they must be in order for the end product to be called port) but much of the cellar space is just for show. And as in the early days, many of the port houses are still owned by the English. Yet the tradition of port making — and port drinking — is decidedly Portuguese.

Where to drink it…

Porto, or Oporto, is the center of the port wine industry, though the port houses of Porto are technically in Vila Nova de Gaia, a short walk across the iron-trellised Ponte Luís I bridge, made by a partner of Eiffel. Here there are more than a dozen port houses, like the more touristy Sandeman, Taylor’s, and Graham’s, along with lesser-known (and still Portuguese owned) Wiese and Krohn, Burmester, and Kopke, the oldest of the Porto port houses.

Some, like Croft and Taylor’s, offer free tours on which visitors learn all about the port history and production, as well as the varying styles. Others, like Sandeman, may change a small fee for the tour and tasting. And still others, like Kopke, don’t offer any tours. Instead, visitors to Kopke can sample by the glass or order a port wine flight, which is paired with chocolates. Tastes range from €1 to €3 on up to €8 to €15 (and much, much higher) depending on the age and style. Or, visitors can opt for

a flight with pairings for just €13.

For one-stop shopping, head to the Port Wine Institute in Porto (there is another one in Lisbon), where you can sample from hundreds of ports starting at €1 per glass while taking in beautiful views of the Douro river. To get closer to the source of the wine, you can also book a day cruise down the Douro. For the ultimate in luxury, stay at The Yeatman Hotel, a wine hotel on the Vila Nova de Gaia side. The hotel offers wine-themed rooms with private patios overlooking Porto, just steps away from the port caves. (Photo courtesy of Flickr/Amaury Henderick)

Try it with…

Most port is traditionally served after dinner with strong cheeses, chocolates, or fruit. White port is served as an aperitif before dinner, with fruit or milder cheeses.

Related: 8 Famous Local Drinks to Try Around the World


8 Frozen Cocktail Recipes Around the World, Because You've Had A Hot Day

All you really need to cope with the incessant heat of late summer is a good booze collection, ice and a blender. It's the blessed trinity of refreshment.

Here are our favorite selections from around the world -- from Peru's delicious pisco sour to France's sidecar (turned into a milkshake, thankyouverymuch).

What are you waiting for? Treat yourself cold.

The sgroppino is what you get when you mix lemon sorbet, prosecco and vodka together -- Italians drink it as a palate cleanser before dinner or as a dessert drink.

The lava flow is sort of the kitschy-Waikiki cousin of the piña colada, but it's more delicious because you feel like you're in Hawaii. It's coconut and light rums mixed with bananas, pineapples and frozen strawberries (sorry, not real lava).

This Brazilian classic, usually served on the rocks with muddled sugar and limes, gets refreshed when you blend cachaça, lime juice and simple syrup with ice.

The best drink for those "long mornings after" is even better when the Irish whisky and espresso is blended with creme de menthe, almond milk and a scoop each of vanilla and coffee ice creams.

The best drink to come out of Prohibition is said to have started in Paris in the early 1920s, where it was served chilled in a coupe, but there's nothing that says you can't take the cognac, cointreau and lemon juice combo and turn it into a frozen shake. Hennessy created theirs by substituting the juice with lemon sorbet and adding vanilla ice cream, triple sec and ice.

Throw white rum, simple syrup, lime juice, a lot of fresh mint leaves and crushed ice into a blender and pour into your glass. See the Food Network's technique here.

Pisco sours are heavily popular in Peru, where it is widely presumed to have been invented in the early 1900s. It's made with pisco (a white burgundy), fresh lime juice, simple syrup, an egg white and angostura bitters. We see nothing wrong with shaking those together to a froth and pouring into a highball, but blending it up with ice is a great way to upgrade.

We can't leave out the margarita, a classically beloved cocktail, frozen or otherwise -- this recipe, from HuffPost's Joe Satran, includes a secret ingredient (frozen limeade). Pour tequila, orange liqueur and frozen limeade into a blender with ice. That's it! "Measurements are NOT important in this recipe," he blessedly explains.


8 Frozen Cocktail Recipes Around the World, Because You've Had A Hot Day

All you really need to cope with the incessant heat of late summer is a good booze collection, ice and a blender. It's the blessed trinity of refreshment.

Here are our favorite selections from around the world -- from Peru's delicious pisco sour to France's sidecar (turned into a milkshake, thankyouverymuch).

What are you waiting for? Treat yourself cold.

The sgroppino is what you get when you mix lemon sorbet, prosecco and vodka together -- Italians drink it as a palate cleanser before dinner or as a dessert drink.

The lava flow is sort of the kitschy-Waikiki cousin of the piña colada, but it's more delicious because you feel like you're in Hawaii. It's coconut and light rums mixed with bananas, pineapples and frozen strawberries (sorry, not real lava).

This Brazilian classic, usually served on the rocks with muddled sugar and limes, gets refreshed when you blend cachaça, lime juice and simple syrup with ice.

The best drink for those "long mornings after" is even better when the Irish whisky and espresso is blended with creme de menthe, almond milk and a scoop each of vanilla and coffee ice creams.

The best drink to come out of Prohibition is said to have started in Paris in the early 1920s, where it was served chilled in a coupe, but there's nothing that says you can't take the cognac, cointreau and lemon juice combo and turn it into a frozen shake. Hennessy created theirs by substituting the juice with lemon sorbet and adding vanilla ice cream, triple sec and ice.

Throw white rum, simple syrup, lime juice, a lot of fresh mint leaves and crushed ice into a blender and pour into your glass. See the Food Network's technique here.

Pisco sours are heavily popular in Peru, where it is widely presumed to have been invented in the early 1900s. It's made with pisco (a white burgundy), fresh lime juice, simple syrup, an egg white and angostura bitters. We see nothing wrong with shaking those together to a froth and pouring into a highball, but blending it up with ice is a great way to upgrade.

We can't leave out the margarita, a classically beloved cocktail, frozen or otherwise -- this recipe, from HuffPost's Joe Satran, includes a secret ingredient (frozen limeade). Pour tequila, orange liqueur and frozen limeade into a blender with ice. That's it! "Measurements are NOT important in this recipe," he blessedly explains.


8 Frozen Cocktail Recipes Around the World, Because You've Had A Hot Day

All you really need to cope with the incessant heat of late summer is a good booze collection, ice and a blender. It's the blessed trinity of refreshment.

Here are our favorite selections from around the world -- from Peru's delicious pisco sour to France's sidecar (turned into a milkshake, thankyouverymuch).

What are you waiting for? Treat yourself cold.

The sgroppino is what you get when you mix lemon sorbet, prosecco and vodka together -- Italians drink it as a palate cleanser before dinner or as a dessert drink.

The lava flow is sort of the kitschy-Waikiki cousin of the piña colada, but it's more delicious because you feel like you're in Hawaii. It's coconut and light rums mixed with bananas, pineapples and frozen strawberries (sorry, not real lava).

This Brazilian classic, usually served on the rocks with muddled sugar and limes, gets refreshed when you blend cachaça, lime juice and simple syrup with ice.

The best drink for those "long mornings after" is even better when the Irish whisky and espresso is blended with creme de menthe, almond milk and a scoop each of vanilla and coffee ice creams.

The best drink to come out of Prohibition is said to have started in Paris in the early 1920s, where it was served chilled in a coupe, but there's nothing that says you can't take the cognac, cointreau and lemon juice combo and turn it into a frozen shake. Hennessy created theirs by substituting the juice with lemon sorbet and adding vanilla ice cream, triple sec and ice.

Throw white rum, simple syrup, lime juice, a lot of fresh mint leaves and crushed ice into a blender and pour into your glass. See the Food Network's technique here.

Pisco sours are heavily popular in Peru, where it is widely presumed to have been invented in the early 1900s. It's made with pisco (a white burgundy), fresh lime juice, simple syrup, an egg white and angostura bitters. We see nothing wrong with shaking those together to a froth and pouring into a highball, but blending it up with ice is a great way to upgrade.

We can't leave out the margarita, a classically beloved cocktail, frozen or otherwise -- this recipe, from HuffPost's Joe Satran, includes a secret ingredient (frozen limeade). Pour tequila, orange liqueur and frozen limeade into a blender with ice. That's it! "Measurements are NOT important in this recipe," he blessedly explains.


8 Frozen Cocktail Recipes Around the World, Because You've Had A Hot Day

All you really need to cope with the incessant heat of late summer is a good booze collection, ice and a blender. It's the blessed trinity of refreshment.

Here are our favorite selections from around the world -- from Peru's delicious pisco sour to France's sidecar (turned into a milkshake, thankyouverymuch).

What are you waiting for? Treat yourself cold.

The sgroppino is what you get when you mix lemon sorbet, prosecco and vodka together -- Italians drink it as a palate cleanser before dinner or as a dessert drink.

The lava flow is sort of the kitschy-Waikiki cousin of the piña colada, but it's more delicious because you feel like you're in Hawaii. It's coconut and light rums mixed with bananas, pineapples and frozen strawberries (sorry, not real lava).

This Brazilian classic, usually served on the rocks with muddled sugar and limes, gets refreshed when you blend cachaça, lime juice and simple syrup with ice.

The best drink for those "long mornings after" is even better when the Irish whisky and espresso is blended with creme de menthe, almond milk and a scoop each of vanilla and coffee ice creams.

The best drink to come out of Prohibition is said to have started in Paris in the early 1920s, where it was served chilled in a coupe, but there's nothing that says you can't take the cognac, cointreau and lemon juice combo and turn it into a frozen shake. Hennessy created theirs by substituting the juice with lemon sorbet and adding vanilla ice cream, triple sec and ice.

Throw white rum, simple syrup, lime juice, a lot of fresh mint leaves and crushed ice into a blender and pour into your glass. See the Food Network's technique here.

Pisco sours are heavily popular in Peru, where it is widely presumed to have been invented in the early 1900s. It's made with pisco (a white burgundy), fresh lime juice, simple syrup, an egg white and angostura bitters. We see nothing wrong with shaking those together to a froth and pouring into a highball, but blending it up with ice is a great way to upgrade.

We can't leave out the margarita, a classically beloved cocktail, frozen or otherwise -- this recipe, from HuffPost's Joe Satran, includes a secret ingredient (frozen limeade). Pour tequila, orange liqueur and frozen limeade into a blender with ice. That's it! "Measurements are NOT important in this recipe," he blessedly explains.


8 Frozen Cocktail Recipes Around the World, Because You've Had A Hot Day

All you really need to cope with the incessant heat of late summer is a good booze collection, ice and a blender. It's the blessed trinity of refreshment.

Here are our favorite selections from around the world -- from Peru's delicious pisco sour to France's sidecar (turned into a milkshake, thankyouverymuch).

What are you waiting for? Treat yourself cold.

The sgroppino is what you get when you mix lemon sorbet, prosecco and vodka together -- Italians drink it as a palate cleanser before dinner or as a dessert drink.

The lava flow is sort of the kitschy-Waikiki cousin of the piña colada, but it's more delicious because you feel like you're in Hawaii. It's coconut and light rums mixed with bananas, pineapples and frozen strawberries (sorry, not real lava).

This Brazilian classic, usually served on the rocks with muddled sugar and limes, gets refreshed when you blend cachaça, lime juice and simple syrup with ice.

The best drink for those "long mornings after" is even better when the Irish whisky and espresso is blended with creme de menthe, almond milk and a scoop each of vanilla and coffee ice creams.

The best drink to come out of Prohibition is said to have started in Paris in the early 1920s, where it was served chilled in a coupe, but there's nothing that says you can't take the cognac, cointreau and lemon juice combo and turn it into a frozen shake. Hennessy created theirs by substituting the juice with lemon sorbet and adding vanilla ice cream, triple sec and ice.

Throw white rum, simple syrup, lime juice, a lot of fresh mint leaves and crushed ice into a blender and pour into your glass. See the Food Network's technique here.

Pisco sours are heavily popular in Peru, where it is widely presumed to have been invented in the early 1900s. It's made with pisco (a white burgundy), fresh lime juice, simple syrup, an egg white and angostura bitters. We see nothing wrong with shaking those together to a froth and pouring into a highball, but blending it up with ice is a great way to upgrade.

We can't leave out the margarita, a classically beloved cocktail, frozen or otherwise -- this recipe, from HuffPost's Joe Satran, includes a secret ingredient (frozen limeade). Pour tequila, orange liqueur and frozen limeade into a blender with ice. That's it! "Measurements are NOT important in this recipe," he blessedly explains.


8 Frozen Cocktail Recipes Around the World, Because You've Had A Hot Day

All you really need to cope with the incessant heat of late summer is a good booze collection, ice and a blender. It's the blessed trinity of refreshment.

Here are our favorite selections from around the world -- from Peru's delicious pisco sour to France's sidecar (turned into a milkshake, thankyouverymuch).

What are you waiting for? Treat yourself cold.

The sgroppino is what you get when you mix lemon sorbet, prosecco and vodka together -- Italians drink it as a palate cleanser before dinner or as a dessert drink.

The lava flow is sort of the kitschy-Waikiki cousin of the piña colada, but it's more delicious because you feel like you're in Hawaii. It's coconut and light rums mixed with bananas, pineapples and frozen strawberries (sorry, not real lava).

This Brazilian classic, usually served on the rocks with muddled sugar and limes, gets refreshed when you blend cachaça, lime juice and simple syrup with ice.

The best drink for those "long mornings after" is even better when the Irish whisky and espresso is blended with creme de menthe, almond milk and a scoop each of vanilla and coffee ice creams.

The best drink to come out of Prohibition is said to have started in Paris in the early 1920s, where it was served chilled in a coupe, but there's nothing that says you can't take the cognac, cointreau and lemon juice combo and turn it into a frozen shake. Hennessy created theirs by substituting the juice with lemon sorbet and adding vanilla ice cream, triple sec and ice.

Throw white rum, simple syrup, lime juice, a lot of fresh mint leaves and crushed ice into a blender and pour into your glass. See the Food Network's technique here.

Pisco sours are heavily popular in Peru, where it is widely presumed to have been invented in the early 1900s. It's made with pisco (a white burgundy), fresh lime juice, simple syrup, an egg white and angostura bitters. We see nothing wrong with shaking those together to a froth and pouring into a highball, but blending it up with ice is a great way to upgrade.

We can't leave out the margarita, a classically beloved cocktail, frozen or otherwise -- this recipe, from HuffPost's Joe Satran, includes a secret ingredient (frozen limeade). Pour tequila, orange liqueur and frozen limeade into a blender with ice. That's it! "Measurements are NOT important in this recipe," he blessedly explains.


8 Frozen Cocktail Recipes Around the World, Because You've Had A Hot Day

All you really need to cope with the incessant heat of late summer is a good booze collection, ice and a blender. It's the blessed trinity of refreshment.

Here are our favorite selections from around the world -- from Peru's delicious pisco sour to France's sidecar (turned into a milkshake, thankyouverymuch).

What are you waiting for? Treat yourself cold.

The sgroppino is what you get when you mix lemon sorbet, prosecco and vodka together -- Italians drink it as a palate cleanser before dinner or as a dessert drink.

The lava flow is sort of the kitschy-Waikiki cousin of the piña colada, but it's more delicious because you feel like you're in Hawaii. It's coconut and light rums mixed with bananas, pineapples and frozen strawberries (sorry, not real lava).

This Brazilian classic, usually served on the rocks with muddled sugar and limes, gets refreshed when you blend cachaça, lime juice and simple syrup with ice.

The best drink for those "long mornings after" is even better when the Irish whisky and espresso is blended with creme de menthe, almond milk and a scoop each of vanilla and coffee ice creams.

The best drink to come out of Prohibition is said to have started in Paris in the early 1920s, where it was served chilled in a coupe, but there's nothing that says you can't take the cognac, cointreau and lemon juice combo and turn it into a frozen shake. Hennessy created theirs by substituting the juice with lemon sorbet and adding vanilla ice cream, triple sec and ice.

Throw white rum, simple syrup, lime juice, a lot of fresh mint leaves and crushed ice into a blender and pour into your glass. See the Food Network's technique here.

Pisco sours are heavily popular in Peru, where it is widely presumed to have been invented in the early 1900s. It's made with pisco (a white burgundy), fresh lime juice, simple syrup, an egg white and angostura bitters. We see nothing wrong with shaking those together to a froth and pouring into a highball, but blending it up with ice is a great way to upgrade.

We can't leave out the margarita, a classically beloved cocktail, frozen or otherwise -- this recipe, from HuffPost's Joe Satran, includes a secret ingredient (frozen limeade). Pour tequila, orange liqueur and frozen limeade into a blender with ice. That's it! "Measurements are NOT important in this recipe," he blessedly explains.


8 Frozen Cocktail Recipes Around the World, Because You've Had A Hot Day

All you really need to cope with the incessant heat of late summer is a good booze collection, ice and a blender. It's the blessed trinity of refreshment.

Here are our favorite selections from around the world -- from Peru's delicious pisco sour to France's sidecar (turned into a milkshake, thankyouverymuch).

What are you waiting for? Treat yourself cold.

The sgroppino is what you get when you mix lemon sorbet, prosecco and vodka together -- Italians drink it as a palate cleanser before dinner or as a dessert drink.

The lava flow is sort of the kitschy-Waikiki cousin of the piña colada, but it's more delicious because you feel like you're in Hawaii. It's coconut and light rums mixed with bananas, pineapples and frozen strawberries (sorry, not real lava).

This Brazilian classic, usually served on the rocks with muddled sugar and limes, gets refreshed when you blend cachaça, lime juice and simple syrup with ice.

The best drink for those "long mornings after" is even better when the Irish whisky and espresso is blended with creme de menthe, almond milk and a scoop each of vanilla and coffee ice creams.

The best drink to come out of Prohibition is said to have started in Paris in the early 1920s, where it was served chilled in a coupe, but there's nothing that says you can't take the cognac, cointreau and lemon juice combo and turn it into a frozen shake. Hennessy created theirs by substituting the juice with lemon sorbet and adding vanilla ice cream, triple sec and ice.

Throw white rum, simple syrup, lime juice, a lot of fresh mint leaves and crushed ice into a blender and pour into your glass. See the Food Network's technique here.

Pisco sours are heavily popular in Peru, where it is widely presumed to have been invented in the early 1900s. It's made with pisco (a white burgundy), fresh lime juice, simple syrup, an egg white and angostura bitters. We see nothing wrong with shaking those together to a froth and pouring into a highball, but blending it up with ice is a great way to upgrade.

We can't leave out the margarita, a classically beloved cocktail, frozen or otherwise -- this recipe, from HuffPost's Joe Satran, includes a secret ingredient (frozen limeade). Pour tequila, orange liqueur and frozen limeade into a blender with ice. That's it! "Measurements are NOT important in this recipe," he blessedly explains.


8 Frozen Cocktail Recipes Around the World, Because You've Had A Hot Day

All you really need to cope with the incessant heat of late summer is a good booze collection, ice and a blender. It's the blessed trinity of refreshment.

Here are our favorite selections from around the world -- from Peru's delicious pisco sour to France's sidecar (turned into a milkshake, thankyouverymuch).

What are you waiting for? Treat yourself cold.

The sgroppino is what you get when you mix lemon sorbet, prosecco and vodka together -- Italians drink it as a palate cleanser before dinner or as a dessert drink.

The lava flow is sort of the kitschy-Waikiki cousin of the piña colada, but it's more delicious because you feel like you're in Hawaii. It's coconut and light rums mixed with bananas, pineapples and frozen strawberries (sorry, not real lava).

This Brazilian classic, usually served on the rocks with muddled sugar and limes, gets refreshed when you blend cachaça, lime juice and simple syrup with ice.

The best drink for those "long mornings after" is even better when the Irish whisky and espresso is blended with creme de menthe, almond milk and a scoop each of vanilla and coffee ice creams.

The best drink to come out of Prohibition is said to have started in Paris in the early 1920s, where it was served chilled in a coupe, but there's nothing that says you can't take the cognac, cointreau and lemon juice combo and turn it into a frozen shake. Hennessy created theirs by substituting the juice with lemon sorbet and adding vanilla ice cream, triple sec and ice.

Throw white rum, simple syrup, lime juice, a lot of fresh mint leaves and crushed ice into a blender and pour into your glass. See the Food Network's technique here.

Pisco sours are heavily popular in Peru, where it is widely presumed to have been invented in the early 1900s. It's made with pisco (a white burgundy), fresh lime juice, simple syrup, an egg white and angostura bitters. We see nothing wrong with shaking those together to a froth and pouring into a highball, but blending it up with ice is a great way to upgrade.

We can't leave out the margarita, a classically beloved cocktail, frozen or otherwise -- this recipe, from HuffPost's Joe Satran, includes a secret ingredient (frozen limeade). Pour tequila, orange liqueur and frozen limeade into a blender with ice. That's it! "Measurements are NOT important in this recipe," he blessedly explains.


8 Frozen Cocktail Recipes Around the World, Because You've Had A Hot Day

All you really need to cope with the incessant heat of late summer is a good booze collection, ice and a blender. It's the blessed trinity of refreshment.

Here are our favorite selections from around the world -- from Peru's delicious pisco sour to France's sidecar (turned into a milkshake, thankyouverymuch).

What are you waiting for? Treat yourself cold.

The sgroppino is what you get when you mix lemon sorbet, prosecco and vodka together -- Italians drink it as a palate cleanser before dinner or as a dessert drink.

The lava flow is sort of the kitschy-Waikiki cousin of the piña colada, but it's more delicious because you feel like you're in Hawaii. It's coconut and light rums mixed with bananas, pineapples and frozen strawberries (sorry, not real lava).

This Brazilian classic, usually served on the rocks with muddled sugar and limes, gets refreshed when you blend cachaça, lime juice and simple syrup with ice.

The best drink for those "long mornings after" is even better when the Irish whisky and espresso is blended with creme de menthe, almond milk and a scoop each of vanilla and coffee ice creams.

The best drink to come out of Prohibition is said to have started in Paris in the early 1920s, where it was served chilled in a coupe, but there's nothing that says you can't take the cognac, cointreau and lemon juice combo and turn it into a frozen shake. Hennessy created theirs by substituting the juice with lemon sorbet and adding vanilla ice cream, triple sec and ice.

Throw white rum, simple syrup, lime juice, a lot of fresh mint leaves and crushed ice into a blender and pour into your glass. See the Food Network's technique here.

Pisco sours are heavily popular in Peru, where it is widely presumed to have been invented in the early 1900s. It's made with pisco (a white burgundy), fresh lime juice, simple syrup, an egg white and angostura bitters. We see nothing wrong with shaking those together to a froth and pouring into a highball, but blending it up with ice is a great way to upgrade.

We can't leave out the margarita, a classically beloved cocktail, frozen or otherwise -- this recipe, from HuffPost's Joe Satran, includes a secret ingredient (frozen limeade). Pour tequila, orange liqueur and frozen limeade into a blender with ice. That's it! "Measurements are NOT important in this recipe," he blessedly explains.


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